Teaching Tips

Exam Prep: Writing Essays

English language exams typically have a writing section, and many of those require test-takers to write an essay in a timed environment. If your students are preparing for such an exam, here are some practices they can employ to better prepare themselves for the writing section.

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Comprehension Checks

It’s important to conduct comprehension checks when teaching new material. If you’re not already familiar with these, here’s what you need to know.

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The Shape of Writing

The shape of paragraphs can be an indicator of the style of a piece of writing. Taking these shapes into consideration when writing or editing can help improve the final draft.

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Allow Time for Answers

After asking a question, it’s important for teachers to wait for answers. Sometimes, waiting even a few seconds can seem to drag on, but leaving that time open allows students to better engage with the lesson

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YLE Prep: Listening

Here a four things teachers can practice with their students to prepare them for the Listening sections of the Cambridge English: Young Learners Exams.

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Resources for Students at Home

This spring, many schools have shut down because of the spread of COVID-19.  Whether you’re continuing to teach remotely or are simply giving your students assignments so they can learn on their own, here are a few resources we’d like to recommend.

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Why Forced Recall is Important

When a student is taking a while to answer a question, it’s easy to cut their thoughts short and jump to the answer yourself or give another student the chance. But waiting for the first student to think might be better for their brains.

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Reasons to Read Aloud

While we tend to read quietly on our own, reading aloud in a classroom can have multiple benefits, including practicing inflection, making the passage more engaging, checking for comprehension, and more.

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Review by Way of Ordering

One way to review is by putting things in order – whether it’s sequential, by likelihood, or other – since it requires students to compare things see how they relate to one another, which means they’ll need a solid understanding of the topics.

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