Students learn English best when they are engaged and having fun.  Insights to English projects range from short-term to year-long and include topic-based projects, webquests, writing prompts, and more.  There’s a variety of individual, pair, small group, and class-wide projects available.

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Pun-chlines

Here’s a great way to practice idioms and other sayings by changing a detail or two to fit a new context. Students get to deliver jokes by substituting one of the words from that expression with another word similar in either sound or meaning.

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Resolutions

Students get to practice Future Forms and Adverbs (word, phrases, and clauses) as they set their New Year’s Resolutions.

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Good Cop / Bad Cop

This project is for practicing INDIRECT QUESTIONS. Students will act as investigators asking witnesses for information. But some witnesses will only respond to Direct Questions, some only to Indirect Questions, and some only to Commands.

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People-First Language

This project is for practicing RELATIVE CLAUSES. Students learn about disabilities/disorders and about the people who have them. As we discuss them it’s often appropriate to have the modifier after the person, which can be done with Relative Clauses.

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Natural Disasters

This project is for practicing ACTIVE & PASSIVE ADJECTIVES. Students learn about and compare different natural disasters, including what causes them and the effect they have on the world. This project is mostly done as a giant class discussion.

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Careful What You Wish for

This project is for practicing WISHES & REGRETS. Students create a scenario in which a wish comes true! But the main character is never satisfied an wishes for more. Only the students can decide if the character eventually learns to be content.

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You Know Me So Well

This project is for practicing QUESTION TAGS. Students play The Newlywed Game – except as friends – and instead of stating what they believe to be true, they’ll put it in the form of a question.

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Sillylympics

This project is for practicing GERUNDS. Students design and participate in silly activities in the style of the Olympics.

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For the Good

This project is for practicing ADVERBIAL CLAUSES. Students engage in a webquest to learn more about an activism event or campaign, building awareness of social, environmental, or economical causes while practicing grammar!

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Fairy Tales Interrupted

This project is for practicing PROGRESSIVE/CONTINUOUS TENSES. Students will first conjure a backstory to a fairy tale character and lay out a scene, then investigate the scenes that other teams have put together to determine what was going on.

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Another Time, Another Place

This project is for practicing REPORTED SPEECH. Teams design a scenario, a setting, and a quote. Then other teams are challenged with reporting it in other settings/scenarios. See how many they can do in under a minute.

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Milestones

This project is for practicing PASSIVE VOICE. Students note key moments or achievements across history within a chosen field and discuss why they are important.

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Family Feud

This project is for practicing ‘WH’ QUESTIONS. Students create the content for the game by writing questions. Next, they conduct a survey, and finally they get to play the game!

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Looking Ahead

This project is for practicing FUTURE INFINITIVES (verb patterns). Students write down hopes, intentions, expectations, and more for the next month, year, and couple decades.

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The Inside Scoop

This project is for practicing PAST PERFECT. Interview someone who took part in or witnessed an interesting event, then write an article about it. Some of the details filled in should be in the Past Perfect form.

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Create a Choose-Your-Own-Adventure Story

This project is for practicing CONDITIONALS. Create a number of scenarios, each of which leads to two others. When you’ve finished, readers can choose which path they want to take, and by the end their story experience will be different from others.

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Memes

A popular way of expression on the internet is through memes. Depending on their age and access to the internet, your students probably see memes quite frequently. Why not take the opportunity to use them to practice English?

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These articles contain ideas to get you started!  We encourage teachers to further customize these projects to best suit their learners’ level, interests, and needs.