Students learn English best when they are engaged and having fun.  Insights to English projects range from short-term to year-long and include topic-based projects, webquests, writing prompts, and more.  There’s a variety of individual, pair, small group, and class-wide projects available.

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Batteries Not Included

Students are prompted with a few disclaimers, then work backward to create a product for which all of those disclaimers would apply.  Students get to be creative and silly as they learn to both understand and explain the meaning and need of various disclaimers and product features.

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Myths Live On

English has many words with Greek roots, and some of those are based in Greek myths. In this WebQuest, students will learn about a character from Greek mythology, one of their key stories, and some of the vocabulary words that are named after that character.

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Closed Captioning

Writing Subtitles or CCs for a short video can be a great way for students to pay more attention to sentence structure, including identifying phrases and clauses. It may also be good for vocab exposure.

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Let Me Introduce Myself

Students formulate an introduction for a character that makes quite the first impression, whether that character comes from fiction, pop culture, history, or the students’ own imaginations.

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Merit Badges

Students create earnable badges for their classmates as the year goes on to reward one another for their accomplishments in the classroom.

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Missing Verse

Students analyze song lyrics to understand the tone, message, themes, and style, then write a missing third or fourth verse.

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Scene and Herd

‘Herd’ and ‘flock’ are words for groups of animals, but some animals have a group term specific to their species. These venery terms typically have addition (more common) meanings, so for this project students will combine the two definitions into one scene.

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Unlikely Hero

Students create a character with two very different jobs, one in a mild-mannered profession, and another as an action hero. How do they use their skills, tools, and knowledge of the former to help them as the latter?

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Deconstructing a Video Essay

Writing essays isn’t always fun, but with many learners (especially kids and teenagers) watching lots of YouTube videos these days, chances are they watch plenty of video essays. For this project, they’ll deconstruct a few to see how essays can be done in a more interesting way.

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Scout Patches

Students create fun, challenging, and silly patches or merit badges, inspired by the ones that Girl Scouts or Boy Scouts might earn through their accomplishments.

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Fictionary

Students write their own mini-dictionary (or an excerpt of one) based on a fictional property they enjoy, providing definitions to made-up words.

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This Day in History

Throughout the year (or semester), students take turns writing headlines for something that happened on that day, but for any year in the past. These headlines are displayed on the classroom wall.

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Different Perspectives

Students will write a description of the same place multiple times. Each time, they’ll do so from a new perspective, one that requires them to think about and focus on different things, and even the tone of the description should be a little different each time.

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Clouds and Constellations

Different people can look up at the clouds or at the stars and see different things from the person standing next to them. In this project, students will have to defend what shapes they see by identifying its features.

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Pun-chlines

Here’s a great way to practice idioms and other sayings by changing a detail or two to fit a new context. Students get to deliver jokes by substituting one of the words from that expression with another word similar in either sound or meaning.

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Resolutions

Students get to practice Future Forms and Adverbs (word, phrases, and clauses) as they set their New Year’s Resolutions.

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These articles contain ideas to get you started!  We encourage teachers to further customize these projects to best suit their learners’ level, interests, and needs.