Featured Videos

TENSES VIDEO SERIES

 

About our Videos

  • free

  • for teachers; apply these methods using your own style for your students.

  • demonstrate steps, patterns, or rules-of-thumb to make the topics easier to remember.

  • new videos every month

  • exclusive supplementary materials like printouts, slideshows, bonus notes, and extended videos are available for Insiders.

 

 

Featured Student Projects 

From a Picture, a Thousand Words

They say a picture is worth a thousand words.  Indeed, there is so much one can say about any given image.  So let's see just how much we can say about one picture.

This project is divided up into sessions, and each session has a number of questions. The students need to describe, analyze, and speculate on everything they see in the image.  read article

<SHORT-TERM PROJECTS>

Student Blogging

A great way to engage students is to create projects within contexts and formats that they are already using in their personal lives.  One of my favorite ways of doing this is through blogs.  Teenage students already spend a lot of time online, especially on social media sites, so why not encourage them to continue their online interactions, just in English instead?  read article

<YEAR-LONG PROJECTS>

 

WebQuest: Uncommon Hobbies

Think of a hobby that’s pretty uncommon, at least where you live. Then do a webquest to find out what exactly the hobby is, what it’s special, who does it and more. Is it something you’d like to try? read article

<WEBQUESTS>

Essay Prompts: This vs. That

Make your students form an argument as to why something is better than the alternative.  Of course, you should first go over the structure of an essay, and maybe various phrases one could use in an argument.  But to prompt them for further practice, here are twenty topics.  They should choose which of a pair to support, and their arguments could be subjective, objective, or both.  read article

<WRITING PROMPTS>

 

 

Featured Teaching Tips

 I've found that using colors when writing on the whiteboard can be helpful in multiple ways.  Colors can be used to create associations  in the minds of learners. The more you repeat the same method of color usage, the more those associations will strengthen in the learners' minds. Using these associations,  students are quicker to find mistakes or identify what they're supposed to do.    Read More

I've found that using colors when writing on the whiteboard can be helpful in multiple ways. Colors can be used to create associations in the minds of learners. The more you repeat the same method of color usage, the more those associations will strengthen in the learners' minds. Using these associations, students are quicker to find mistakes or identify what they're supposed to do. Read More

 'Good' is such a boring word. Why say 'good' when you could say 'positive', 'appropriate', 'beneficial', or plenty of other synonyms with more specific definitions. 'Good' is just too broad. If you  forbid your students from using 'good'  - a word they have reason to use often - they'll have to learn some of its synonyms and the differences between all those synonyms.  It's a great way to improve their vocabulary.    Read More

'Good' is such a boring word. Why say 'good' when you could say 'positive', 'appropriate', 'beneficial', or plenty of other synonyms with more specific definitions. 'Good' is just too broad. If you forbid your students from using 'good' - a word they have reason to use often - they'll have to learn some of its synonyms and the differences between all those synonyms. It's a great way to improve their vocabulary. Read More

 There are lots of multi-syllable official terms we use exclusively for English class. Words that are long, strange-sounding, and infrequent enough that they are hard to remember.  As long as learners understand a concept, who cares what name they attach to it?  Make it easier on them by using simpler and more memorable made-up terms instead. (You'll notice we do these in our videos.)   Read More

There are lots of multi-syllable official terms we use exclusively for English class. Words that are long, strange-sounding, and infrequent enough that they are hard to remember. As long as learners understand a concept, who cares what name they attach to it? Make it easier on them by using simpler and more memorable made-up terms instead. (You'll notice we do these in our videos.) Read More

 

 
 

 

Featured Printouts

printouts teaser.jpg